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Why a "Dramatically Different" Toyota Corolla is a Bad Idea

By Joel Arellano | August 02, 2012
Are you ready for an all-new, all-different Toyota Corolla? Neither are we. But that's the expectation for the upcoming model reports Ward's Auto. William Fay, group vice president and general manager for the Toyota division, says "some (within Toyota) have said it is an even more dramatic change." Toyota, of course, was mum about specifics. Ward's Auto points to the Toyota Avalon, which debuted at the New York auto show earlier this year, as an example of how "dramatic" such a change could potentially be. Personally, we're against such "dramatic" changes for the Corolla. Styling's a two edge sword that can help sell a model (e.g.: BMW's so-called "Bangle butt;" or Hyundai's fluidic sculpture design language) or hinder it (Pontiac Aztek, anyone? Dodge Caliber, maybe?). Common wisdom is that if something's not broken, don't fix it. The Corolla built its rep on reliability and fuel-economy, not styling. Finally, the compact sedan is Toyota's number two best-seller right after the Camry. Does the automaker really want to take chances on such a cash cow? A more tangible example of why Toyota shouldn't make major changes is the Corolla's larger sibling, the Toyota Camry. Traditionally, the Corolla has looked like a smaller version of the mid-sized sedan, something Toyota owners expect as well. The 2012 Toyota Camry does sport a new grille, head and taillights, and a sleeker chassis, but nothing eye-poppingly different. We think, instead, Toyota should focus on refining the Corolla to be even more fuel-efficient, with a few nips, tucks, and a few collagen injections here and there for good measure. Oh, and make its Entune infotainment system standard on the Corolla. Isn't that what Gen Y buyers--the main Corolla buyers--want anyway? Source: Wards Auto [polldaddy poll=6435686]
  • 2012 Toyota Corolla Front Three Quarter 1024X640
 
2 comments
Mike
Mike

What about the PT Cruiser as a complete design fail? They had to stop production (in 2010??) because nobody bought the cars anymore.

Lepke
Lepke

Compare this Toyota Corolla to Hyundai Elantra, Hyundai Elantra has 40 Gal/miles (HWY) and Toyota Corolla has only 34 Gal/miles (HWY). With raising gas prices, Hyundai Elantra might be a cheaper choice.

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